Cody Choi

Cody Choi, Venetian Rhapsody – The Power of Bluff, 2016-17. Neon, LED, Steel, Canvas, PVC. 1243x1033x111cm. Day installation view at the Korean Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia. Photo by Riccardo Tosetto. Courtesy of the Artist.

Cody Choi

Cody Choi, The Thinker, 1995-96. Toilet paper, Pepto-Bismol, Wood. Installation view at the Korean Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia. Photo by Riccardo Tosetto. Courtesy of ARARIO Museum and the Artist.

Cody Choi

Cody Choi, Cody’s Legend vs. Freud’s Shit Box, Ed 2/3+AP, 2017. Bronze, wood, steel. Installation view at the Korean Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia. Photo by Riccardo Tosetto. Courtesy of the Artist.

Lee Wan

Lee Wan, Proper Time: Though the Dreams Revolve with the Moon, 2017. 668 clocks. Dimensions variable. Installation view with For a Better Tomorrow at the Korean Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia. Photo by the Artist. Courtesy of the Artist.

Lee Wan

Lee Wan, Made In, 2013-present. 12 documentaries and 12 objects. Made In objects installation view. Photo by the Artist. Courtesy of the Artist.

Lee Wan

Lee Wan, Mr. K and the Collection of Korean History, 2010-2017. Photographs and assorted archive objects. Dimensions variable. Installation view at the Korean Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia. Photo by the Artist. Courtesy of the Artist.

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Venice

Cody Choi and Lee Wan’s “Counterbalance: The Stone and the Mountain”

In “Counterbalance: The Stone and the Mountain,” Cody Choi and Lee Wan, representing Korea for the 57th Venice Biennale, engage with the spawning disparity they encountered in their transnational journey to find their own identity. Current international political movements such as right-wing populism and restrictions on immigration influenced these two artists to delve into the borderless issues of glocalism. Choi came to prominence in New York art scene in the 1990s, a time of considerable turmoil in Korea. He created Venetian Rhapsody, a cluster of neon signs to critique “casino capitalism.” Lee Wan comes from a younger generation, and is debuting an installation of 600 clocks engraved with the personal details of people the artist met while traveling around the world, entitled Proper Time. On view through November 26, the project was commissioned by Arts Council Korea and curated by Daehyung Lee.

“Recent world events and trends, such as the rise of right-wing populist movements and general backlash against immigrants have brought issues of identity and difference to the fore. The two artists that the Korean Pavilion is featuring are delving into the machinations of global networks as well as into the politics of identity, each offering a different window into our shared world, whilst reflecting on the influence and repercussions of worldwide phenomena on Korea,” said Lee.

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