Biennale di Venezia

Photo by Andrea Avezzu'
Courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia.

Arsenale

Photo by Andrea Avezzu'
Courtesy of La Biennale di Venezia.

Central Pavilion of Giardini

Arsenale

John Akomfrah 
Mimesis: Seven
Ambiguities of Colonial Disenchantment 
2018  
Three channel HD colour video
installation, 7.1 sound  73 minutes 
© Smoking Dogs Films 
Courtesy Lisson Gallery.

John Akomfrah
Mimesis: Seven Ambiguities of Colonial Disenchantment
2018
Three channel HD colour video installation, 7.1 sound
73 minutes
© Smoking Dogs Films
Courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Chiara Fumai

Chiara Fumai
The Moral Exhibition House
2012
Commissioned by dOCUMENTA (13) and produced with the support of Fiorucci Art Trust, London
Courtesy of Chiara Fumai and Maria Montesi.

View Gallery - 5 images
Venice

Everything You Need to Know About the 2019 Biennale Arte in Venice

The 58th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia, “May You Live in Interesting Times,” will take place from May 11 through November 24, 2019. Curated by Ralph Rugoff, the Biennale Arte 2019 welcomes 79 artists from all over the world to present works at the Giardini and the Arsenale, as well as around other venues in Venice. Special for this year is the decision to have each artist present two works—one at the Giardini and one at the Arsenale—to show the duality of their creativity.

“The 58th International Art Exhibition will not have a theme per se but will highlight a general approach to making art and a view of art’s social function as embracing both pleasure and critical thinking,” said Rugoff. “Artists who think in this manner offer alternatives to the meaning of so-called facts by suggesting other ways of connecting and contextualizing them.“

This year, there are 90 national participations in the historic pavilions at the Giardini, at the Arsenale, and in the historic city of Venice. First-timers include five new countries—Algeria, Ghana, Madagascar, Malaysia, and Pakistan. And for the first time, the Dominican Republic will host its own national pavilion.

“Twenty years have passed since, in this same location, I presented my first Exhibition,” said Paolo Baratta, President of La Biennale di Venezia. “Let me tell you, they have been very interesting times. At the beginning we were criticized for the presence of the pavilions, considered old-fashioned in times of cosmopolitanism and globalization. We live in times where some people raise the doubt that cosmopolitanism might also have been a way for the most influential cultural and political realities to exert a sort of soft power. We are an international exhibition that since those years put the word[s] ‘open’ and ‘plateau of humankind’ as the subtitle for all the following biennials.”

Newsletter

Go inside the the worlds of art, fashion, design, and lifestyle.