Dior

Courtesy of Dior.

Dior

Courtesy of Dior.

Dior

Courtesy of Dior.

Dior

Courtesy of Dior.

Dior

Courtesy of Dior.

Dior

Courtesy of Dior.

Dior

Courtesy of Dior.

Dior

Courtesy of Dior.

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Paris

Dior’s Choir-Filled Cathedral for SS21

This morning in Paris, Dior debuted its Spring/Summer 2021 collection in a fit of fashion rebellion. Its mainstay location, Jardin des Tuileries, was turned into a choir-filled cathedral, first greeting guests to a stark white exterior and a glowing yellow circle featuring the outline of a purple hand.

Inside, steeping stained-glass windows served as the show’s backdrop, while the show began to revolve around revolution. As guests filled the space, the show began to show the striking scenography designer in collaboration with the Italian collage artist Lucia Marcucci. The surrounding stained glass installations glowed with this theme, too—collaged photos of Renaissance-era women, musicians, artists, and more revealed them at times when they were fighting back.

As the show began, high pitched vocals by the Sequenza 9.3 ensemble were directed by the conductor Catherine Simonpietri to the music of Lucia Ronchetti, poetically shaking the room. With Opera-quality singers stationed around the runway singing Sangu di rosa, models walked out into the black void one by one, lit by a strong light from above. Part eerie, part evocative, the powerful presentation led with reflection.

Continuing her look at the origins of fashion and the meaning of creation, Designer Maria Grazia Chiuri revealed an abundance of new looks that spoke to the changing times we’re experiencing today. Focused on feminine beauty, she propels a new notion. While we are radically changing to adhere to a new lifestyle brought on by crisis, we are also transforming our habits and rituals. Here, for SS21, that allowed Chiuri to transform the house’s silhouette to respect its heritage. Shapes are aimed to spark sensation, cuts are dedicated to communicating thoughts.

In a natural color palette of clays, ferns, and rocky landscapes, we saw scarves take on patchwork detailing in a mix of floral and paisley motifs; the essence of clothing—from men’s shirts to coats—celebrated through skills known to Japanese and Indonesian artisans; and whimsical dresses adorned with sheer tie-dye kimonos, tapered at the waist with a thin CD belt.

Long skirts were also paired with effortless sandals; headbands and short veils complemented other accessories—from thin necklaces to small backpacks; leather vests were worn open atop high-neck dresses; and the house’s classic Bobby bag got the bohemian treatment, too.

To complement the show, a video by the filmmaker Alina Marazzi was commissioned by Chiuri. Acting as a tribute to Marcucci’s beautiful mixture of text, textiles, images, and vocal poetry, it divulges the power of fashion and touched upon the creative process of artists during times of revolution.

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