Edie Parker

Edie Parker on Madison Avenue.
Photo by Erik Dalzen.
Courtesy of Edie Parker.

Edie Parker

Edie Parker on Madison Avenue.
Photo by Erik Dalzen.
Courtesy of Edie Parker.

Edie Parker

Edie Parker on Madison Avenue.
Photo by Erik Dalzen.
Courtesy of Edie Parker.

Edie Parker

Edie Parker on Madison Avenue.
Photo by Erik Dalzen.
Courtesy of Edie Parker.

Edie Parker

Edie Parker on Madison Avenue.
Photo by Erik Dalzen.
Courtesy of Edie Parker.

Edie Parker

Edie Parker on Madison Avenue.
Photo by Erik Dalzen.
Courtesy of Edie Parker.

Edie Parker

Edie Parker on Madison Avenue.
Photo by Erik Dalzen.
Courtesy of Edie Parker.

Edie Parker

Edie Parker on Madison Avenue.
Photo by Erik Dalzen.
Courtesy of Edie Parker.

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New York

Edie Parker Takes a Place on Madison Avenue

February was a fashion-filled month for designers and industry onlookers alike— and for Edie Parker, it was no different. That month the brand opened its first flagship store, at 781 Madison Avenue, with 1,000 square feet full of handbags, accessories, exclusive products, specialty pieces, and a double-sided bespoke program. In collaboration with Studio Muretto, Brett Heyman designed the store to meet the brand’s vivacious personality.

“The inspiration behind the store’s design was ‘Gio Ponto meets Gloria Vanderbilt,’ as I wanted the store to feel residential—sort of like visiting someone’s groovy apartment before a night out,” said Heyman. “We want to invite our customer into the world of Edie Parker.”

Inviting and high-spirited, the boutique is also a careful and colorful display of unusual art and interior pieces. Materials that are iconic to Edie Parker are seen throughout the space, like acrylic archways and custom acrylic color-block tables—and this time with pearlescent and brass detailing, which is available by special order. There’s a self-portrait by Alex Israel hung above aluminum-and-brass shelving, against wooden aquarelle panel walls by Meike Harde. The new space also is home to vintage Paul McCobb chairs that are upholstered in Pierre Frey’s “Arlequins” print, which was created in 1925, atop the Danube marble floors.

Throughout the store, it is a delight to see classics, fan favorites, and store exclusives of the brand’s, such as the Flavia Palms and the Jean Rainbow Stripe—both bestsellers. As a pioneer for customization and bespoke designs, Edie Parker expanded last year to include home goods pieces, which can be found at the store, including octagonal boxes, breakfast trays, and card cases. Also new for the brand are double-sided bespoke offerings, and shadow letters, too. This exciting launch for the brand celebrates personalization by allowing customers to select the shape, color, clasp, and font details—in script or print lettering—in any color of the rainbow.

 

This article appears in Whitewaller New York, out now.

 

 

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