Kristen Cole on What’s New at Forty Five Ten

Kristen Cole
Portrait courtesy of Forty Five Ten.

Forty Five Ten has become an icon of fashion in Dallas. Kristen Cole, the store’s president and chief creative officer, lives with art at home, so she finds it equally important to present compelling art for clients shopping at the space. This April, Forty Five Ten is presenting new works by Al Freeman, expanding to New York, and evolving the concept shopTenoversix into 4510/SIX, so Whitewaller saw fit to catch up with Cole just in time for it all.

Forty Five Ten
Courtesy of Forty Five Ten.

WHITEWALLER: Tell us a bit about how you came across the artist Al Freeman, and what works the store is presenting during the Dallas Art Fair.

KRISTEN COLE: My husband, Joe Cole, introduced me to her and her gallerist, after doing a studio visit with her in Brooklyn. We first saw her work at the Upstairs Art Fair in Amagansett last summer and instantly fell in love with it.

The irreverent and sculptural works will be exhibited on the third floor of our flagship Downtown Dallas store in April. I love the puffy vinyl fabrication, and I’ve always been drawn to work that highlights the mundane—everyday objects and experiences seen in a new light.

WW: Tell us about the store’s art program.

KC: Forty Five Ten’s art program is a bit casual and organic. We collect, exhibit, and commission work from contemporary artists. Like the pieces at The Joule, our collection is owned by Tim Headington and includes Tracey Emin, Juergen Teller, Jose Dávila, Catherine Opie, Mario Testino, and many others.

We are currently exhibiting a Greg Bogin piece, as well as photography by Ward Roberts. Our latest piece was a commissioned work by Brooklyn artist Katherine Bernhardt for our café, No Aloha, while our upcoming efforts include Daniel Arsham’s Snarkitecture firm for aspects of the New York store.

WW: Forty Five Ten’s concept shop, Tenoversix, has recently evolved into 4510/ SIX. What has changed?

KC: The brand evolution came together last fall. We wanted to retain the right balance of the core aesthetic and edit of Tenoversix, so we evolved it into 4510/SIX as a category within to house emerging design and fashion. It’s really a great complement to the luxury designer collections we are known for. 4510/SIX will also be the expression of our private label and collaboration pieces.

Forty Five Ten
Courtesy of Forty Five Ten.

WW: No Aloha features commissioned work by the Brooklyn artist Katherine Bernhardt. Can you tell us about that?

KC: Katherine Bernhardt’s painting at No Aloha is a site-specific, permanent piece that Forty Five Ten commissioned. It’s an immersive experience, from the walls and ceiling to the ceramics we serve in. The cups, saucers, and plates are all editioned and exclusive to Forty Five Ten, and will be in our retail soon. It’s bright, wild, and tropical. We chose the name No Aloha as a nod to The Breeders.

WW: In addition to Dallas, Forty Five Ten has locations in Napa, Miami, and Aspen. This spring, it will make its debut at The Shops at Hudson Yards in New York. What can guests expect?

KC: Forty Five Ten New York will continue to focus on the best directional edit across emerging and designer collections in menswear, womenswear, accessories, beauty, and design. We are also debuting a new vintage category exclusively in New York that I’m very excited to dip into. The New York space is about the same size as our Dallas flagship so will have similar representation. The environment itself is very beautiful, with art installation–inspired experiential moments. My husband and I designed the space and worked with many talented people on it, most notably Snarkitecture on our custom glass-brick facade, and Greg Bogin on some colorful and sculptural pieces for the 4510/SIX area. It’s really something to see!

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